Monday 30 October

  • Keynote Lecture
    Before you came, what did you dream university would be like?
    - Making the strange familiar, and the familiar strange, and zombies.
    Professor Richard Buckland, University of NSW
    10am - 11am, Abel Smith Lecture Theatre (23), Room 101
    Listen to recording of this event

    About

    Education is important to mankind and to civilisation. Our ability to learn is why we rule the planet, and not tigers or bears.

    It can seem difficult to teach our students other than how we ourselves were taught, difficult logistically and difficult politically and culturally. 

    Yet applying our analytical, playful, skeptical scholarly minds to the question of the best ways of teaching, and critically reflecting on what our desired outcomes of education really are, can lead to classes and experiences and students which are inspiring and which remind us why we have chosen this life.

    We’ll look critically at online education, flipped approaches, Billy Joel, assessment, students as partners, kindness, teaching at scale and stories and tips from the frontline. The best way to learn is from mistakes, and the best mistakes to learn from are those of others - so come and hear a selection of Professor Buckland’s more catastrophic and amusing mistakes.

    Who should attend?

    All UQ staff and students

    Benefits of attending

    • Enjoy a light-hearted, humorous lecture
    • Take on a fresh perspective on what it means to be a teacher
    • Be inspired to re-imagine your teaching and your teaching outcomes
  • Student Led Panel
    Connecting the prose and the passion: how can UQ help students connect their university educations with their lives, their goals, and their future success?
    Chair: Professor Fred D'Agostino (President of the Academic Board)
    11am - 12pm, Able Smith Lecture Theatre (23), Room 101 *a light lunch will be served at this event
    View PowerPoint from this event       Listen to recording of this event

    Presenters

    Chair: Professor Fred D'Agostino, President of the Academic Board

    Student presenters

    Mr Thomas Mackay, Medicine

    Ms Sarah Ritchie, Humanities and Social Sciences

    Ms Joss Kessels, Science

    Ms Penelope Bristow, Business, Economics and Law

    Mr Jack O’Brien, Engineering, Architecture and Information Technology

    Ms Elizabeth Bartetzko, Health and Behavioural Sciences

    About

    E M Forster said: Only connect! This statement embodies the idea of taking your abiding passion and using it to embolden the way you live. Each of us has the potential, as a student, to do something more than 'go through the motions' to 'get the credential'; success depends on making a connection with something in our studies, in our cohort, or with some co-curricular activity.

    In this panel discussion, outstanding UQ students will discuss how UQ teachers and support staff can (and do!) help students find their individuality during their courses of study, and how we can all foster the making of connections that will multiply the value of everything we do.

    Who should attend?

    All UQ Staff and Students

    Benefits of attending

    For students

    • Be inspired to follow your passions from hearing stories of students following theirs
    • Understand how you can get involved in University activities to enhance your UQ experience

    For staff

    • Gain valuable insights into how to foster and connect students to their passions and potential to enhance your teaching
  • Workshop
    Towards Uniting Learning Analytics and Students as Partners
    Dr Hassan Khosravi, Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation (ITaLI)
    12pm - 1pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 *a light lunch will be served at this event
    View PowerPoint from this event       Listen to recording of this event

    About

    Learning analytics and students-as-partners are two active research areas that place a focus on improving learning and enhancing the learning experience of students in higher education.

    In this workshop, an overview of each of these two fields will be provided. Participants be invited to work in small groups to think of innovative ways that learning analytics and students-as-partners may be united at UQ and beyond. A current project, which at its core has relied upon co-creation of course content to unite learning analytics and the students-as-partners approach, will also be presented.

    Who should attend?

    All UQ staff (including professional staff) and students

    Benefits of attending

    • Understand how Learning Analytics and Students-as-Partners may be integrated into your course
  • Panel + Showcase
    The Graduate Teaching Assistant Program Showcase
    Associate Professor Pedro Isaias, Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation (ITaLI) 
    12pm - 1pm, General Purpose South Building (78), Room 343 *a light lunch will be served at this event
    View PowerPoint from this event 

    Presenters

    Associate Professor Pedro Isaias, Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation (ITaLI)
    Maria Dolhare, TC Beirne School of Law
    Robyn Choi, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
    Lintje Siehoyono Sie, UQ Business School
    Matthew Henry, Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
    Muath Shraim, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
    Jo'Anne Langham – UQ Business School

    About

    The Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTA) program is designed to foster the next generation of great teachers. The program provides participants with the knowledge and skills to motivate and engage with students, embed active learning practices into teaching, manage group dynamics, give and receive feedback, and design assessment and evaluation.

    This showcase and panel event will highlight the benefits for post-doc and current PhD students of acquiring teaching skills for their academic career development. By formally acquiring teaching skills through the program, participants will have a cutting-edge advantage to tutor at UQ or other higher education institutions. 

    The showcase will include explanations of the following:

    • The structure and organisation of GTA program
    • The time commitment to attend the GTA program
    • The benefits of participating in the program.

    A panel discussion with former students will focus on the advantages of the program to their career.

    A selected numbers of GTAs will showcase their learning through a poster presentation, which include lesson planning, active learning techniques, and using technologies in teaching.

    Who should attend?

    • Postdoc and PhD students
    • Academic and professional staff interested in learning more about the program and/or promoting the program to students

    Benefits of attending

    For students

    • Learn about teaching tools and techniques. See teaching concepts used by former GTAs
    • Interact with former GTA participants to understand the benefits of participation and have your questions about the program answered
    • Understand how the GTA program can contribute to your career development
    • Enjoy a free lunch!

    For staff

    • Get the information you need to promote the program to your students
  • Panel
    Open content: New directions in supporting teaching and learning at UQ
    Chair: Dr Gillian Hallam, Information and Digital Literacy, UQ Library
    1pm - 3pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 
    View PowerPoint from this event       Watch Panel Discussion video

    Presenter/s

    Chair: Dr Gillian Hallam, Information and Digital Literacy, UQ Library 
    Bill Beach, Associate Director, Client Services with UQ Library
    John Zornig, Acting Director, UQx
    Dr Sam McKenzie, Project Manager, UQ Student Strategy
    Kerry Kilner, Director, AustLit
    Pablo Riveros, Educational Designer, Faculty of Science
    Jessica Stevens, PhD candidate in Intellectual Property and Innovation Law, QUT

    About

    This event will introduce participants to some of the key features of open content in higher education.  Open educational resources have been defined as teaching and learning materials which are available for everyone to use with the goals of utilising web technologies to share freely, improve access to wide groups of stakeholders, prevent duplication, promote economic efficiencies and avoid restrictive copyright practices (Jisc, 2016). Open educational resources extend from small individual learning assets through to large Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), as well as encompassing open textbooks and student generated content.

    The invited panel members will provide you with the opportunity to learn about the different dimensions of open content from the perspectives of policy and practice. The issues covered will introduce participants to the characteristics of open content, provide insights into the creation and management of OERs, consider the legal requirements of open licensing and outline the resources and networks available to academic and professional staff.  The discussion will appeal to those who want to know how open content can support student learning outcomes, as well as those who have already explored the pedagogical opportunities and can share their experiences.

    [1] Jisc (2016). Open educational resources. https://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/open-educational-resources

    Meet the Panel

    Gillian Hallam is the Manager of Information and Digital Literacy with the University of Queensland Library, Gillian Hallam is responsible for the University’s strategic framework for information and digital literacy which aims to shape the policies and practices to support high quality learning experiences and internationally significant research outcomes in the contemporary academic world.  In recognition of her academic career as an educator, researcher and consultant to the library and information sector, Gillian was awarded Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in 2017 and is a Adjunct Professor with Queensland University of Technology.

    Dr Sam McKenzie has been working in Higher Education for 13 years. For the last 8, she has been at The University of Queensland (UQ). Her roles at UQ have included teaching biostatistics as an Academic in the School of Public Health and as a Professional staff member as a Learning Designer and now as a Student Strategy Project Manager in the Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation.  As part of her role in ITaLI, she is working with Teaching Space Management on the refurbishment and development of teaching and learning spaces in amongst other cool teaching and technology projects.

    Kerry Kilner is the Director and General Editor of AustLit, an important element of Australia’s digital humanities research infrastructure developed through a nation-wide collaboration of researchers, scholars and librarians over the past 20 years. Kerry has been involved in AustLit since its inception in the late 20th century and aspires to see AustLit become a sustainable open access resource but is yet to find the business model to make that goal a reality.

    Pablo Riveros is an Educational Designer (eLearning) in the Faculty of Science. Using a collaborative approach to driving innovation in higher education, Pablo leads university transformations with open initiatives and free educational tools. In 2015, Pablo developed and created the first Open Educational Resources (OER) "Quality in Learning and Innovation” website in the faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Universidad Arturo Prat, Chile.  Pablo is an active member and contributor of global open education initiatives and resources including Blackboard International and was the winner of the Community Design Competition for Blackboard World in 2017.

    Jessica Stevens is a PhD Candidate in intellectual property and innovation law at QUT. Her research focuses on copyright and the sustainability of open business models as a means to disseminate cultural and knowledge goods. She holds degrees in Law and Arts (Journalism) from Griffith University, and a Masters of Law from QUT. Jessica is a member of Creative Commons Australia and is an advocate for Open Access and Open Education. She comes to QUT from private legal practice, having been admitted as a solicitor since 2012.

    Who should attend?

    • All UQ Teaching staff
    • Professional staff engaged in T&L
    • The event will be of great value to professional staff, including librarians, learning designers, and educational technologists, as well as academic managers. The session will be an opportunity for those new to the field to learn more and for those with experience to share their knowledge.

    Benefits of attending

    • Develop your awareness and understanding of the opportunities and challenges of using open content in teaching and learning
    • Get some tips to introduce open content into your courses
    • Understand how UQ Library can support you as you explore the use of open content.
  • Workshop
    Transitioning a course to be fully online – tips for implementation and engagement
    Mr Carl Sherwood, School of Economics
    3pm - 4pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 
    View PowerPoint from this event       Listen to recording of this event

    About

    ECON1310 is a large first year introductory statistics service course in the School of Economics. Over the last 4 years, the method of delivering lectures has gradually transformed.  Initially, two-hour face-to-face lectures were presented to around 400 students twice a week. Now, in 2017 the course is offered fully online with no face-to-face lectures.  By reflecting on experiences encountered during this transition, this presentation and workshop will be to highlight:

    • Lessons learnt during the transition to a fully online course
    • Practical strategies to enable you to transform your existing course to a partially or fully online course
    • What works and pitfalls to avoid in making this transition
    • Tips on students’ performances, satisfaction, and their learning experiences
    • The benefits and value on moving the course fully online from both the students’ and lecturer’s perspectives
    • Issues around sustainability, value and utility in relation to quality, time and effort devoted in creating learning materials
    • The impact of tutorials and small group learning when there are no live lectures.

    Come along with a course in mind that you would like to transform into an online course. 

    During the session, you will be asked to:

    • Reflect on and discuss key presentation topics
    • Brainstorm how to transition your individual course online
    • record ideas progressively on worksheets throughout the one hour presentation

    Who should attend?

    All UQ Teaching staff

    Benefits of attending

    • Gain insights as to whether or not you would benefit from moving your particular course(s) partially or fully online
    • Appreciate the time, resources, and commitment to transition to a partially or fully online course
    • Understand the benefits that flow from moving your course online
    • Be aware of likely the reactions from students and staff of courses being partially or fully online.

Tuesday 31 October

  • Luncheon (Invitation only)
    Teaching@UQ Reunion Luncheon
    Mr Dom McGrath, Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation (ITaLI) 
    12pm - 1pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202

    About

    Teaching@UQ prepares academic staff new to UQ for teaching and learning through an institution-wide technology-enhanced professional development program.

    Join the program team and fellow participants to share success stories, network and enjoy lunch.

    Who should attend?

    Any UQ staff member who has engaged in the Teaching@UQ Program

    Benefits of attending

    • Network with colleagues from across UQ
    • Enjoy a free lunch
  • Panel
    UQ ePortfolio: Evidencing the Learning Journey
    Mr Sam Harris, UQ e-Portfolio team and Ms Greta Hunter-Scott, UQ e-Portfolio team
    1pm - 2pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 
    View PowerPoint from this event       Listen to recording of this event

    About

    An interactive panel discussion focusing on the evolving teaching and learning use cases of the UQ ePortfolio. The panel members are drawn from a range of Schools using the ePortfolio, with participants encouraged to draw upon the experience of those currently using the ePortfolio for improving teaching and learning outcomes. The panel discussion will explore:

    • Using the ePortfolio for evidencing the student’s learning journey
    • Informing teaching and learning strategies from reporting
    • Improving student’s employability through showcase
    • Navigating the integration process

    In addition, participants will have the opportunity to question panellists directly on areas most relevant to their areas of interest.

    Participants will interact via QR Coded digital tools, including live polls, word cloud, and message wall. Questions will be taken from participants on entrance and curated to facilitate discussion, with open floor questioning of the panel opening up later in the discussion.

    Who should attend?

    All UQ Teaching and Professional staff

    The panel will feature a mixture of Academic and Professional staff. Professional staff members will be able to raise questions most relevant to their everyday practice.

    Benefits of attending

    Attend this event to gain:

    • A broader understanding of the teaching and learning capabilities of the ePortfolio via specific case studies
    • Information related to integrating the ePortfolio within your School
    • Access to contacts from the ePortfolio Community of Practice
  • Showcase
    Employability at UQ: Aligning activities to the UQ Employability Framework
    Chair: Dr Dino Willox, Director, UQ Student Employability Centre

    2pm - 5pm, Learning Innovation Building 17 Room 202 
    View PowerPoint from this event       Listen to recording of this event

    Presenter/s

    Chair:
    Dr Dino Willox, Director, UQ Student Employability Centre
    Presenters:
    Dr Sarah Bennett, School of Social Science
    Mr Nimrod Klayman, UQ IdeaHub 
    Dr Daniel Schull and Dr Aaron Herndon, School of Veterinary Science
    Ms Alicia Toohey, School of Languages and Cultures
    Ms Katrina Grieg, UQ Student Employability Centre
    Ms Holly Voges, President of the Postgraduate Student Society in the School of Biomedical Sciences 
    Ms Cate Clifford, BEL SET
    Dr Caroline Wilson-Barnao, School of Communication and Arts
    Ms Laura Jeffress, Student Employability, EAIT
    Ms Yvonne Oberhollenzer, Student Futures Team, HASS

    About

    The employability development of our students continues to be a priority at UQ and many staff are successfully incorporating key employability concepts into programs, courses and other learning activities.  This session will highlight a range of curricular and extracurricular initiatives across UQ which align with one or more pillars of the UQ Employability Framework - Awareness, Experiences, Learning and Transfer.  The session will encourage discussion on the challenges around aligning a course, program or activity to the framework, and share lessons learned.

    Listen in to representatives from 10 programs currently underway institution wide, and participate in active discussion to both answer your questions and brainstorm your own ideas for practice.

    View full program here.

    Who should attend?

    This session is suitable for both academic and professional staff likely to be involved in facilitating activities that enhance student employability.

    Benefits of attending

    Gain an understanding of:

    • The UQ Employability Framework;
    • How the framework can be applied across both curricular and extra-curricular activities;
    • The challenges of aligning the framework to a course/program or activity
    • Be provided with an opportunity to consider how to apply the framework to your own practice.

Wednesday 1 November

  • Workshop
    Celebrating Large Course Programs + Designing assessment for higher-order thinking
    Associate Professor Susan Rowland and Dr Christine Slade, Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation (ITaLI)

    8:30am - 10am, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 *Breakfast will be served at this event
    View PowerPoint from this event

    About

    In this interactive workshop participants will design assessment items for higher order thinking. Higher-order thinking (or higher order thinking skills (HOTS)), is an educational concept that draws on learning taxonomies (such as Bloom's taxonomy).

    When we encourage students to engage in higher-order thinking we are asking them to analyse, evaluate, and synthesise ideas and information, rather than simply asking them to remember. 

    In this workshop we will consider how we can design assessment items to encourage our students to engage in critical thinking and problem solving behaviours, both of which are important for their success in the workplace and in the world.

    Who should attend?

    Large Course Coordinators
    Any T&L staff interested in developing new course assessment

    Benefits of attending

    • Learn about and witness examples of best practice and co-design improvements for course assessment items;
    • Critically evaluate and then consider how to design assessment items to encourage your students to engage in critical thinking and problem solving behaviours, both of which are important for their success in the workplace and in the world.
  • Workshop
    Faculty of Science Teaching and Learning Workshop 2017
    10am-12pm, Hawken building 50, Room C207 *Everyone welcome

    About

    In this informal workshop we will discuss some key issues for teaching and learning in science.

    Program:

    Louise Kuchel “Communication skills for science graduates”

    Susan Rowland “Work-integrated learning in the Bachelor of Science”

    Morning tea break

    Discussion facilitated by Peter Adams “How can we move to more effective assessment practices?”

  • Interactive Panel
    Oh Snap(chat)! Do I Have Your Attention?: Teaching and Learning with Gen Y and Gen Z
    Dr Marissa Edwards, School of Business and Mr Michael Jennings, School of Mathematics and Physics

    1pm - 2pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 *Afternoon tea will be served at this event
    View PowerPoint from this event       Listen to recording of this event

    About

    Evidence suggests that the current generations of students in our classrooms have particular characteristics and expectations that set them apart from previous generations.

    For example, Gen Y students prefer active learning approaches in the classroom and are highly dependent on technology; they are more ethnically and racially diverse, and also more politically progressive; and research indicates that these students are also more narcissistic and entitled than previous generations.  Gen Z students are the most recent cohort of students to enter university; they are also reliant on technology, especially social media, and have been described as entrepreneurial, self-conscious, demanding, practical, and highly motivated.  Both Gen Y and Gen Z students present educators with unique opportunities in the teaching and learning domain.

    In this panel, we will reflect on some of the challenges associated with teaching these students, and discuss our experiences creating effective learning activities and assessment with these cohorts. We will also consider some of the major skills that educators need to effectively engage and connect with these students, especially in large first year classes. 

    Presenters

    Dr. Jocelyne Bouzaid, Academic Skills Adviser at QUT
    Ms Charlotte Pezaro from the UQ School of Education
    Dr. Michael Jennings from the UQ School of Mathematics and Physics
    Ms Bronte Thompson, current UQ Business School student

    Who should attend?

    All UQ Teaching staff

    Benefits of attending

    Attend this event to gain:

    • Knowledge of the characteristics and behaviours of Gen Y and Gen Z students 
    • Practical experience with active learning activities to use with these students
    • Knowledge of the major skills needed to engage with Gen Z and Gen Y cohorts in the classroom.
  • Workshop
    How to tweak your science assignments to improve communication skills of your students
    Dr Louise Kuchel and Ms Rebecca Mills, School of Biological Sciences

    1pm - 2pm, Sir Llew Edwards Building 14 Room 217
    View PowerPoint from this event       View Ideas Bank handout from this event       View Key Feature and Principles handout from this event       Listen to recording of this event

    About

    This practical, hands-on workshop will enable you to tweak your existing written and spoken science assignments to make the communication skills within them explicit to students, and help students develop and improve those skills.

    Approximately 30% of assessment tasks in the BSc at UQ are written or spoken assignments yet many teachers complain that students do not communicate to the standard expected. Recent research shows that many core communication skills are implicit or absent from these types of assignments, but the good news is that assignments can easily be tweaked to enable our graduates to become effective communicators of science in a variety of contexts.

    We will discuss the key features that make an assignment effective at developing communication skills, identify relevant activities and support materials for you and your students, and workshop effective marking criteria.

    Bring your own assignment instructions to work on, or work with examples provided.

    Who should attend?

    All UQ Teaching staff, particularly those from the Science faculty

    Benefits of attending

    Attend this workshop if you are interested in:

    • Modifying your existing assignment instructions, supporting activities and marking criteria
    • Supporting your students to develop and improve their communication skills.

    Resources that you will take away with you include:

    • Improved assignment instructions, activities and marking criteria
    • Key features of an assignment that develop students’ communication skills
    • A short list of core communication concepts and skills that are easily integrated into common types of science assignments, and which do not require special expertise to teach
    • Example learning activities and marking criteria for communication skills
    • Online communication resources for science students (CLiPS).
  • Workshop
    Valuing Teaching: Reward and Recognition at UQ
    Professor Lydia Kavanagh, EAIT and Professor Fred D’Agostino, President of the Academic Board

    2pm - 3pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 
    View PowerPoint from this event       Listen to recording of this event

    About

    There are significant changes afoot in the way that UQ rewards and recognises great teaching: from introducing Higher Education Academy accreditation, to developing metrics for teaching evaluation, to devising a system of Continuing Professional Learning, to proposing changes to tenure and promotion processes.

    Join us for an update on the various proposals, and a dynamic discussion.

    This will be an active session where your voice is heard and you can make a difference to the valuing teaching initiative at UQ.

    Who should attend?

    All UQ teaching and professional staff

    Benefits of attending

    • Learn about current UQ initiatives for reward and recognition of teaching to inform your career path and enable goal planning in the T&L space
    • Share your voice on enhancing professional teaching development at UQ.
  • Panel
    The Future of Work: Developing Entrepreneurial Skills to Future-Proof Careers
    Mr Bernie Woodcroft, Director of ilab and a Panel of startup founders and academics, TBC

    5pm - 7pm, ilab at UQ, Building 41

    Presenters

    Charlotte Hill General Manager of Sidekicker

    Bachelor of Social Sciences, Economics UTS and has worked in multiple banking areas, corporate marketing and now, the start-up world. Charlotte is General Manager of Sidekicker is an on-demand staffing platform that is used by 3000+ companies, including the likes of Uber, Park Hyatt, Brisbane Racing Club and Seek to hire qualified staff to complete hourly or daily jobs.

    Greg Marston, Head of Social Sciences

    Professor Greg Marston has undertaken social research in a range of fields drawing on a variety of social science disciplines, including social policy, sociology, political economy, social work and policy studies. He has expertise in qualitative approaches to social inquiry and has used different methods to explore a range of contemporary issues, including: poverty and debt; refugee resettlement; housing and homelessness; income support; unemployment; the changing mixed economy of welfare; and the role of social policy and urban planning in addressing the climate change challenge.

    Rosie Odsey, Community Manager of Codebots

    Rosie is part of the Community team at Codebots, a technology startup based in Brisbane, Australia. She spends her time shaping the product and member experience of the Codebots platform and can't wait to launch the beta later this year. Prior to Codebots, Rosie launched the Queensland Startup Precinct and co-created Startup Hatch, QUT's Startup Student Association and incubator. She is one of the curators for Startup Digest Brisbane and is a self-confessed hackathon/Startup Weekend addict.Has a Bachelors degree in Finance with a Master of Accounting and Graduate Certificate in Creative Industries from QUT. 

    Elliot Smith, Founder of Maxwell MRI

    Maxwell MRI was founded in 2016 by Elliot Smith and Matthew Brown with the goal to reduce unnecessary, invasive and costly follow-on tests and improve the patient experience. Maxwell MRI is an AI and MRI powered diagnostic test for prostate cancer. They give clinicians, researchers and companies the tools they need to accelerate the design, development, delivery of clinical diagnostics built upon medical imaging, pathology and other data. Elliot has a background in Electrical Engineering and has a PhD in Electrical/Biomedical Engineering and is on his second startup, having built a respiratory management and monitoring system based on his postgraduate thesis.

    About

    Disruptive forces are at play, fundamentally changing the way in which people work and live their lives. Automation, globalisation and innovation are terms which have been received negatively by the average Australian fearful of losing their income and livelihoods. The idea of a job for life or working for what we know today as an employer will change substantially with the World Economic Forum predicting the majority of workers will be contracted by 2030. We know the world of work will change with technology playing a major role, we just don't know how.

    The Future of Work presentation addresses the imminent changes in the world of work impacting students, graduates, researchers and professional and academic staff. It will highlight personal stories from panelists on their own startup journeys and provide a handbook to build an entrepreneurial skill set.

    Hear about the startup journey of a postgraduate student and researcher as well as the academic perspective.

    Who should attend?

    All UQ staff and students

    Benefits of attending

    For everyone

    • Learn about the statistics around the way work is predicted to change
    • Be exposed the broad range of entrepreneurial activities in both UQ and South East Qld
    • Ask questions from the panellists
    • View a showcase of UQ startups

    For staff

    • Receive a handbook to assist you in effectively signposting students and researchers to opportunities that exist locally

Thursday 2 November

  • Workshop
    Fostering the contemplative art of deep reading in a digital age
    Dr Judith Seaboyer, School of Communication and Arts 

    9am - 11am, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 *Morning tea will be served at this event
    View PowerPoint from this event       Listen to recording of this event

    About

    Students don’t read; so runs one thread of the debate in the media and the academy around the future of reading in a digital age. This complex problem certainly predates the web, but it is exacerbated by changing technology. Skimming and keyword spotting have become essential techniques for coping with “the pace of information production” (Ziming Liu, 2005). While such techniques have their place, it’s clear constant scanning risks incompetence when it comes to deep reading, and without this skill students are unlikely to develop the capacity to explore and engage the texts that scaffold their discipline.

    This workshop will address theories of reading supported by empirical research that shows feedback-rich online quizzes result in exponential increases in pre-class reading of the deep and profoundly enjoyable kind that depends on “the slow and meditative possession of a book” (Sven Birkerts).

    We will workshop question-writing skills and consider how quizzes might enrich the work you and your students do together.

    Participants are requested to bring a piece of required reading (a novel, a scholarly article, a chapter from a text) and one salient point from that text they would like students to grasp before they come to class.

    Who should attend?

    All UQ Teaching staff

    Benefits of attending

    Learn how to:

    • Create an effective feedback-rich quiz
    • Use the data the online program will produce in your teaching to encourage deep reading in your students.
  • Workshop
    Using online simulations for active learning in large courses: Business students climbing Mt Everest
    Presenters from School of Business

    9am - 11am, Sir Llew Edwards Building (14), Room 217 *Morning tea will be served at this event
    Listen to recording of this event

    Presenter/s

    Associate Professor April Wright
    Dr Geoff Greenfield
    Dr Cle-Anne Gabriel
    Dr Anna Krzeminska
    Dr Gemma Irving
    Mrs Elizabeth Nichols
    Mr Ross Strong

    About

    This workshop explores how online simulations can be integrated into large courses to promote experiential learning of course theory and practice.

    Simulations create simplified ‘real world’ contexts for students to experience how theories can be applied to inform decision making in and around organisations. Drawing on the Everest Team Simulation as an illustrative example, this workshop will provide practical guidance on how to effectively integrate an online simulation into a large course to create more meaningful and challenging learning experiences and assessment.

    Through interactive activities and discussion linked to experiences with the Everest Team Simulation, workshop participants will explore questions such as:

    • How can I integrate a simulation into my course through learning activities and assessment?
    • What are the keys to using simulations effectively in large courses?
    • How much extra administrative and coordination work do simulations create for the teaching team in large courses?

    The workshop will be presented by academics who have integrated the Everest Team Simulation into an introductory management course with enrollments in excess of two thousand students per year and who have published research investigating student experiences in this course in international journals.

    Who should attend?

    • All UQ Teaching staff
    • Professional staff involved in organising administrative and timetabling support for teaching with online simulations

    Benefits of attending

    Participants will:

    • Appreciate how to integrate a simulation into a course through learning activities and assessment
    • Understand the opportunities and challenges of using simulations to promote experiential learning and student engagement, especially in very large courses
    • Gain insights into how to adapt and apply online simulations to the participant’s own teaching
    • Receive physical takeaways in the form of resources and materials that provide support for teaching with simulations.
  • Seminar
    e-exams – Reflections on experience with program-wide implementation
    Dr Tammy Smith and Mrs Kate Drinkwater, Medicine

    11am - 12pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202
    Listen to recording of this event

    About

    The session will report on the e-exams pilot underway within the medical program. The ExamSoft platform supports exam question development, question banking and tagging, exam creation and delivery, quality assurance review and learning analytics.  It is being used in classes of 500 this semester, with 24-hr turnaround for exam sitting, marking, review and detailed feedback to students.   

    Who should attend?

    Anyone interested in use of e-exams for large cohort programs.

    Benefits of attending

    Understand the logistical and other adjustments required when using the program, as well as benefits of introducing e-exams.

  • Walking tour and Q&A session
    Guided walking tour of UQ Teaching Spaces
    Mr Matthew Scott, Teaching Spaces and Dr Sam McKenzie, Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation (ITaLI)

    1pm - 2pm, Starting location Learning Innovation Building (17), Level 2 Foyer

    About

    There are various types and styles of teaching spaces of varying qualities.  This quick guided tour will showcase some of our most effective spaces as well as some that need further development. Hear about the tools and resources available to you in each space, and how best to translate your course requirements into room allocations.

    Who should attend?

    Academics who teach in centrally-controlled teaching spaces

    Benefits of attending

    Understand what space UQ has to offer, the direction for teaching and learning space and how particular spaces might assist you with course delivery.

  • Workshop
    Teaching Chinese Students: Challenges & Strategies for Success
    Dr Karen Hughes and Dr Chris Hodkinson, School of Business

    1pm - 2pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202
    View PowerPoint from this event       Listen to recording of this event

    About

    Teaching multicultural student cohorts can be challenging, as there are cultural differences in the student-teacher relationship and in terms of in-class behaviours. This presentation will explore the cultural beliefs underlying the key differences between Western and Chinese approaches to teaching and learning and highlight key challenges. We will then show-case some of the techniques and activities we have used in the classroom to engage Chinese students. The session will conclude with a discussion of common pitfalls and tips for success.

    Who should attend?

    All UQ Teaching staff

    Benefits of attending

    Attend this event to gain:

    • An understanding of WHY Chinese students may not be responding in the ways you might expect
    • A set of tactics and strategies for engaging Chinese students.
  • Showcase
    The best of online, active and innovative teaching tools and pedagogy
    Multiple presenters (see below)

    2pm - 5pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 *Afternoon tea will be served at this event
    View PowerPoint from this event

    Presenter/s

    Assoc. Prof Paul Henman, School of Social Science
    Assoc. Prof Gwen Lawrie, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
    Ms Ailsa Dickie, UQ eLearning team
    Mr Hoon Siang Gn, School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
    Dr Patrick Ward, School of Biological Sciences
    Ms Inge Matt, Faculty of Humanities and Social Science
    Dr Carol Bond and Associate Professor Bernard McKenna, School of Business
    Dr Mohit Shahi, Biomedical Sciences
    Dr Frances Shapter, School of Veterinary Science
    Ms Roma Forbes, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
    Dr Barbara Hanna and Dr Joe Hardwick, School of Languages and Cultures

    About

    The Innovation Showcase provides an opportunity for all teaching and learning staff to share their innovative teaching tools, techniques and pedagogy.
    View full program here

    To register to the Innovation Showcase on Thursday 2 November, 2-5pm please click here

    Who should attend?

    All UQ Teaching staff

    Benefits of attending

    Attend this showcase to:

    • Learn about teaching and learning innovation occurring at UQ
    • Engage with practitioners to share ideas about teaching and learning innovation
    • Identify practices that might be applied or adapted to your own teaching contexts.
  • Panel
    Teaching Research Methods: Towards A Pedagogic Culture
    Chair: Anthea Groessler, Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation (ITaLI) 

    5pm - 6pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 425 (UQx Innovation Space)

    Presenter/s

    Chair: Anthea Groessler, Institute for Teaching and Learning Innovation 
    Professor Dilly Fung, University College London (remote panel member)
    Mr Carl Sherwood, School of Economics
    Professor Robert Faff, School of Business
    Mr Imam Salehudin, PhD student, School of Business
    Dr Diana Young, School of Social Science

    About

    Researchers agree that there are longstanding challenges around teaching research methods, regardless of methodological approach, discipline or year level. Students, they say, need opportunities to be immersed in research practices through active and authentic curriculum and to develop a standpoint of where they are positioned in the wider research landscape. Students also need to be empowered to think and act like researchers and be well equipped for the challenges and opportunities of the 21st Century.

    The focus of this panel is a move toward a ‘pedagogic culture’, a theme also recommended by researchers. Here we explore rich stories from practice from large scale curriculum redesign to local teaching strategies and tools that academics have developed to support and engage students in their research journeys. 

    For more on the investigation into good practice for teaching research methods read this occasional paper.

    Meet the panel

    Professor Dilly Fung is Professor of Higher Education Development and Academic Director of the Arena Centre for Research-Based Education at the University College London. Dilly has lead the implementation of a research-based curriculum at UCL and is author of the recent publication A Connected Curriculum for Higher Education. Central to this book is developing symbiosis between research and education and creating critical dialogue about educational values. Dilly recommends a ‘through line’ of enquiry into the programme of study to help students build confidence and abilities in research, make conceptual connections and develop a narrative of their learning journey. Based on this work, UCL has recently won finalist for the Higher Education Academy’s (HEA) inaugural Global Teaching Excellence Award.

    Mr Carl Sherwood is a lecturer with the School of Economics (BEL) and creates imaginative resources and collaborative environments that energise the learning experiences of statistics students in large first year classes. A devoted educator with over 15 years’ teaching experience in higher education, Carl’s unique storytelling approach and creation of analogical fish farm characters has enabled students to meaningfully construct their own linkages between abstract statistical concepts and real-world contexts to achieve success in their studies.  Carl has won multiple School, Faculty, UQ and national teaching and learning awards based on his unique and successful approach.

    Professor Robert Faff is Professor of Finance| Director of Research with the UQ Business School. He has particular passion for nurturing and developing the career trajectories of early career researchers. He has lead the development of a ‘pitching research template’ called iTEMPLATES.  iTEMPLATES  is an electronic research planning tool to support novice researchers and aspiring academics formulate a succinct, yet methodical approach to pitch a new scholarly research proposal to an academic expert. However, it also has applications for research skills development, mentoring, engagement and impact. To date, the template has been implemented as part of several post graduate courses and is in the process of turning global with growing interest in adopting this tool.

    Imam Salehudin is a PhD student studying consumer behaviour of mobile game users, specifically willingness (or unwillingness) to pay for in-app purchases. He uses iTEMPLATES tool extensively to structure and communicate his three essay research proposal. He also uses this tool to reverse engineer the literature read for his research and wrote a short letter about it in JAMIS (Journal of Accounting and Management Information Systems) early this year.

    Dr Diana Young is a social anthropologist specialising in visual and material culture, including art and other kinds of stuff.  She is an educator, writer, scholar and curator with senior leadership experience as the director of the UQ Anthropology Museum for eight years. She is an expert at successfully profiling academic research for public engagement, for structured teaching and ad hoc learning through scholarly exhibitions. An influential curator of anthropological material, she also uses museum collection objects for object-centred teaching and learning in university undergraduate classes enabling students to generate their own unique research project.

    Who should attend?

    • All UQ Teaching staff
    • Professional staff engaged in Teaching and Learning development

    Benefits of attending

    Attend this event to:

    • Discuss the challenges of teaching and learning research methods at UQ
    • Discuss ways that educators can have addressed these challenges through various pedagogical strategies or curriculum design
    • Think collaboratively about initiatives that may help promote, sustain and enhance effective teaching of research methods at UQ.

Friday 3 November

  • Workshop
    Many demands, one 8-week intensive: Designing a course to fit
    Dr Rhonda Faragher, School of Education and Dr Sue Creagh, Institute for Social Science Research; School of Education
    12pm - 1pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 *Light lunch will be served at this event
    Listen to recording of this event

    About

    This workshop describes the process undertaken to redesign a course to meet the demands arising from many sources; students were very dissatisfied with previous versions, accreditation bodies had radically revised their requirements, and staff were keen to implement their new research findings in the area.

    In this workshop, participants will be introduced to the theoretical underpinnings of the design process, in particular Constructive Alignment (Biggs, 2014). A framework was adapted from a recent research literature review in the field (Faragher, Hill & Clarke, 2016).

    One challenge was to design teaching materials to ensure students were able to access the expertise of staff who were not assigned to the teaching team. This has been achieved using panels of experts with guest lectures and then follow up video presentations used as learning objects.

    Participants in the workshop will be:

    • Invited to consider a learning outcome for one of their courses and to align assessment tasks and teaching activities to practice Constructive Alignment
    • Shown how to caption a video, using YouTube functions
    • Provided information on strategies for gaining feedback from students.

    [1] Biggs, J. (2014). Constructive alignment in university teaching. Review of Higher Education, 1, 5-22.

    [1] Faragher, R., Hill, J., & Clarke, B. (2016). Inclusive practices in mathematics education. In K. Makar, S. Dole, J. Visnovska, M. Goos, A. Bennison, & K. Fry (Eds.), Research in mathematics education in Australasia 2012-2015 (pp. 119-141). Singapore: Springer.

    Who should attend?

    All UQ Teaching staff

    Benefits of attending

    Understand the use of:

    • Constructive Alignment to design a course
    • Learning objects to involve experts in the course
    • Feedback strategies to track student experience.
  • ITaLI's Teaching Masterclass
    7 Time timesaving hacks to streamline course coordination 
    Associate Professor Bronwyn Lea, School of Communication and Arts, HASS>
    1pm - 2pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202
    View PowerPoint from this event

    About

    Teaching is a rewarding vocation but we all know how time-consuming course administration can be, especially for large courses. Fortunately, there are a lot of tricks that can help you save time, be better organised and more effective, so you can focus on what really matters: student learning.

    In this workshop you'll learn seven hacks designed to help empty your inbox, respond to students faster, streamline and manage course-related paperwork, such as assessment and SAPD requests, and make your Blackboard site work harder to save you time and energy.

    Who should attend

    This course is primarily for academic course coordinators, but professional staff who have high contact with students may also benefit from attending.

    Benefits of attending

    The workshop will incorporate demonstration, as well as some group work. Bring your laptop to set up some of the hacks straight away (optional).

    Overall you’ll learn:

    1. How to apply automated processes (and understand how they save you time)
    2. How to store digital information for ease of retrieval
    3. How to manage and better inform large student cohorts
  • Showcase
    Students as Partners at UQ
    Chair: Ms Lucy Mercer-Mapstone, Students as Partners Program Design Project
    2pm - 5pm, Learning Innovation Building (17), Room 202 *Afternoon tea and canapes will be served at this event
    View PowerPoint from this event

    Presenter/s

    Chairs:

    Ms Lucy Mercer-Mapstone, PhD candidate, Students as Partners Program Design Project 
    Ms Aimee Parker, Program Coordinator, UQ Student Employability Centre, Students as Partners Program Design Project

    Dr Katherine McLay, Lecturer, School of Education
    Ms Aurora Andersen, Student, Bachelor of Arts/Education (Secondary)
    Ms Yvonne Oberhollenzer, Manager (Student Futures), Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
    Ms Ellen Dearden, Project Manager, HASS Crew
    Ms Clarissa Dharmaseta, Student, Bachelor of Business, Management/Communications
    Dr Louise McCuaig, Associate Professor Tim Carroll, Dr Sean Tweedy, Dr Mark Connick, Dr Norman Ng, School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences + HMNS 4th Year research team
    Dr Fiona Lewis, Lecturer, Speech Pathology
    Ms Kate Peucker, Student, Bachelor of Health, Sport and Physical Education
    Ms Robyn Parry, Lecturer, School of Business

    + Student Support Group members
    Ms Rebecca Bomgaars
    Mr Wade Tun
    Ms Annabelle Deeth
    Mr Jack Biddle
    Mr Isaac Nankavill
    Mr Miles Walker
    Dr Eimear Enright, Ms Sue Monsen, Lecturers, Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences

    + Student partners
    Ms Meg Wilkinson
    Ms Bianca Wrigley
    Ms Kate Peuker

    About

    Students as Partners is about harnessing student and staff creativity via collaborative partnerships to enhance teaching and learning. As a way of thinking, students as partners shifts teaching and learning and student engagement from something academics do to students to an endeavour done with students. At UQ and internationally, students as partners has led to the transformation of teaching practices and positive student outcomes.

    UQ, guided by the Student Strategy, is moving toward a model of Teaching & Learning where Students as Partners is ‘business as usual’. The Students as Partners Showcase will give you an opportunity to understand with this can and does look like at UQ by bringing together UQ students, academics, and professional staff to share examples of, and explore in depth, this innovative model for teaching and learning enhancement.

    The event will be an opportunity to:

    • Share Students as Partners practices, ideas, and experiences at UQ
    • Discover new ways of considering Students as Partners in higher education
    • Network with UQ Students as Partners practitioners
    • ​Harness the creativity of staff and students to address teaching and learning challenges.

    View full program here

    Who should attend?

    All UQ staff and students involved or interested in Teaching and Learning enhancement

    Benefits of attending

    • Understand what Students as Partners is and how it benefits Teaching and Learning development at UQ
    • Gain insights into examples of SAP currently underway at UQ and understand how you might integrate into your own university context
    • Participate in active discussion on SAP principles to have a comprehensive understanding of the opportunities and challenges for implementation.