Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science

Academic experiences

I undertook some stock standard science courses including Principles of Pharmacology, Immunology and Chemistry of Metal Ions in Biological Systems.
The university places an emphasis on deep learning of selected material and research rather than shallow understanding of a wide coverage, which was a refreshing change for me.
Assessment is quite rare, some courses only having one exam for the whole semester.
These exams can also be oral rather than written, which is a very different skill and worth learning. The Danes also use a block structure, where you do 15 ECTS (#4 units) per half semester, meaning you're concentrating more on one or two topics, I found it a lot easier to learn with this system. There are also far fewer contact hours in Science, but there is more expected of you when it comes to independent study, which, though not my strong suit, was a fun change in dynamic.

Christmas

Personal experiences

There is a mistake that nearly all exchange students make.
Making exchange student friends, travelling all of Europe and just being a tourist.
All of that is great, but most don't look at what's right in front of them.
I would recommend meeting and getting to know Danes as being one of the top priorities.
I learned the most from my Danish friends, especially about culture, and many of them will be friends I have for the rest of my life.
Exploring Copenhagen itself is an adventure, and it's incredible how well you can get to know a city in six months, but still not know so much of it.
Learn a bit of Danish while you're there; it's super fun even though it's not particularly useful.
While there, I joined Hillsong Church Copenhagen, and that led to personal development on another level, with a lot of volunteering opportunities and Danish friends to be made.

Accommodation

Accommodation is sorted through the UCPH Housing Foundation.
It's an administrative nightmare though. The sign on system crashes regularly, it's impossible to communicate with anyone, it's probably the worst part of the exchange to be honest.
I got stuck in a place called Tranehavegard, where one bedroom apartments have two people in them, not brilliant unless you get a decent roommate.
If I had the opportunity again, I would look to live near my campus in a college.

Tivoli. Park for Weeks. Amusement for Months.

Budget

Stuff can get pretty expensive in Denmark, it's one of very few countries with a higher cost of living than Australia.
Eating out, entertainment, accommodation and public transport are the biggest killers on the pocket. Everything else is pretty similar in price to home.

Academic development and employability

From what I hear, exchange is one of those things that always pops up favourably in job interviews, but I wouldn't actually know.
In terms of academic development, the experience of another university system provides some insight into different methods of learning and priorities in different places.
I also got the opportunity to do some more advanced courses, allowing me to get ahead in my degree.

Highlight

Christmas in Denmark. I actually can't explain the amazingness.
We don't do Christmas right in Australia. I spent Christmas week with a Danish family I knew from church.
There are so many traditions, incredible decorations and the public absolutely adores the season. The food is also awesome on another level.
I got super lucky and my first ever experience of falling snow was on Christmas Day.
I will actually never forget it, it was an incredibly rewarding part of the entire exchange.

Top tips

Plan everything out early. There's loads of red tape with visas, tickets and all such.
Start early and you can save a load of money as well.
Get a Bicycle. Legitimately the only way you should ever travel around Copenhagen!
Meet Danes, join a nice community. Hillsong Church Copenhagen is great if you're a Christian or want to learn about Christianity in a fun environment.
Do the Danish Language Course. Easy way to meet exchange students. Danes also love it when you try to speak Danish, there's no end to the amusement for them.
 

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