Associate Professor Leonie Callaway
Associate Professor Leonie Callaway

Winner:
Transformation of skill acquisition through a comprehensive program of competency assessment: Innovation driven by large student cohorts
School of Medicine

Project Team:
Associate Professor Leonie Callaway, Dr Jennifer Schafer, Patricia Rệgo, Associate Professor Ray Peterson, Professor David Wilkinson

Video:
Assessment and feedback - Awards for the Enhancement of Student Learning - Associate Professor Leonie Callaway [4.2MB]

Transformation of skill acquisition through a comprehensive program of competency assessment: Innovation driven by large student cohorts is an innovative model of assessing competence embedded into a highly structured clinical coaching program which drives a coherent teaching, learning and assessment experience with outstanding outcomes for both students and tutors. It provides high levels of student learning, engagement and satisfaction.

This distinctive program of rolling competency assessment provides opportunities for self and peer assessment, regular formative assessment with feedback, and five weeks per year dedicated to summative assessment. This is a sustainable system which is workable for any number of students.

This new approach has resulted in increasing numbers of students achieving high marks with one-third of students achieving a perfect score for clinical skills acquisition in the two summative assessments held to date in 2008. An additional strength of the program is that frequent competency assessment identifies students who require additional learning support early in the academic year. These students are nurtured in a supportive environment with the focus on encouraging success.

The team’s success in this initiative has contributed to similar radical improvements in other parts of the MBBS program, enabled the School to deliver high quality teaching to a very large medical student cohort and as this system can be applied in any domain where assessment of practical skills is required, has implications for other large cohort programs in the University and beyond.

 

On this site