“The underlying theme here is human health: can we improve quality of life for the healthy, can we cure diseases, can we prevent suffering? Biomedical scientists contribute at many levels, be it understanding normal development and/or function, discovering how a drug works, characterising a new gene or developing a vaccine. We are in an exciting era for biomedical science. Rapid advances in knowledge and technology, combined with strong multidisciplinary research teams, are leading to major breakthroughs.” - A/Prof Jon Curlewis, Major Convenor

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE

The biomedical sciences seek to understand human biology in both health and disease. Major therapeutic breakthroughs in human disease, such as vaccines for polio, measles  influenza, and most recently, cervical cancer at UQ, have been realised through fundamental advances in the biomedical sciences.

At The University of Queensland, this major has a research focus which capitalises on the world-class researchers in the schools and research centres located on the St Lucia campus.  Biomedical science involves many of the traditional scientific disciplines and sub-disciplines which together, in an interdisciplinary approach, are being harnessed to discover new knowledge which will ultimately lead to improved health outcomes.

This major provides excellent preparation for either a challenging and intellectually stimulating career in biomedical research or for entry into postgraduate training in medicine and other health-related professions. With additional training, careers in science management and education are also possible.

This major is administered by the School of Biomedical Sciences.

For further information please contact the Science Faculty.

Students may select courses from one of the following areas in the Biomedical Science major. Please note that this is a guide only and that these study areas will not apear on your graduation certificate. Students will graduate with a Bachelor of Science majoring in Biomedical Science:

  • Anatomy

    Anatomy is the study of structure. There is a strong focus on teaching human anatomy, with a state-of-the art dissection laboratory and museum to facilitate learning about our own body structure and function, knowledge of which underpins many biomedical/paramedical professions. Anatomy provides a broad understanding of how animals are constructed, through different levels of organisation from the molecular level through cells, tissues and organ systems to the whole organism. Anatomical knowledge has many applications across the biological sciences, such as in the research fields of biomechanics, comparative anatomy, developmental biology, genetics, neurobiology and physiology. Modern anatomy incorporates a wide variety of methodological approaches and concepts to aid our understanding of normal and abnormal structure, particularly in relation to development and disease.

  • Developmental Biology

    Developmental biology is the study of the molecular and cellular events underlying the formation of living organisms. The challenge is to decipher how cells, the individual building blocks of nature, are orchestrated with stunning intricacy and precision into complex embryos. Now that the sequencing of the genome of several species, including humans, is completed, the major challenge facing biology is deciphering how this genetic blueprint is transformed into an organism. The field is taking a leading role in the quest for interpreting genomes. It provides ways for working out how genes make organs and tissues. The study of stem cells will continue to revolutionise biomedicine. Discoveries in developmental biology underpin major biomedical advances in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, reproductive technologies, functional genomics and transplantation sciences.

  • Human Genetics

    Human genetics is the study of the human genome, the instruction book of life. Your uniqueness as an individual is written in your genome, your own DNA, as is your shared evolutionary history with all of humanity and with all life on Earth. Sequencing of the human genome is the equivalent to finding the book of life and being able to open it and look at the pictures. We are just starting to understand how to read and integrate the instructions to convert them into flesh and blood. Research in human genetics has already, and will continue to have a defining impact across all areas of biomedical science. Come and find out what all the fuss is about. Contribute to the ethical debate about how our society uses genetic information, from a position of knowledge. Be a part of the future discoveries in human genetics that will identify the genetic mechanisms that define what it is to be human.

  • Immunology and Infectious Diseases

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) currently views infectious disease as the major ongoing threat to global health. Addressing the disease burden inflicted on the global community by agents such as HIV, malaria and tuberculosis as well as newly emerging threats such as SARS and avian influenza is one of the biggest challenges we face in the biomedical sciences. These challenges come at a time of unprecedented advances in research in the fields of immunology and infectious disease. Research teams at UQ are playing a major role in many of the key research areas aimed at developing new vaccines, therapeutic approaches to treatment and in molecular diagnostics. Courses offered within the immunology and infectious disease stream build on this expertise and cover all aspects of immunology and infectious disease in a multidisciplinary approach.

  • Neuroscience

    Neuroscience is the study of the nervous system of animals and humans and is the fastest growing field in biomedical research. The nervous system is a complex array of billions of interconnected fibres, which are responsible for integrating, processing and coordinating sensory information and motor commands. Differentiated into the central (brain and spinal cord) and the peripheral components, the nervous system is comprised of neural circuits, which mediate the coordination and regulation of all movement, the detection of environmental changes and the adjustment of metabolic activity in almost all living things. Modern neuroscience research is encompassing new research technologies in magnetic resonance imaging, bioinformatics, stem cells, bioengineering and behaviour, all of which are drivers of important breakthroughs in our understanding of how the brain works and in alleviating mental health disorders.

  • Pharmacology

    Pharmacology is the study of the mechanism of action of drugs. The understanding of how and why drugs can alter physiological functions forms the basis to the discovery of new drugs as well as the better use of existing drugs for the treatment of human diseases. With the decoding of the human genome, new opportunities now exist for pharmacologists to make major advances in drug design and development that can have a significant impact on human diseases. The different courses that comprise the stream of pharmacology in the Bimoedical Science major will equip students with the essential knowledge and skills to understand drugs and their actions, and the influence of drugs on the physiological functioning of the body. As an integrated science, pharmacology is fundamentally linked to many other disciplines such as physiology, biochemistry and biotechnology.

  • Physiology

    In the context of the biomedical sciences, the discipline of physiology plays a key unifying role, bringing together the research from related areas into the whole organism. Physiology aims to explain how our bodies maintain a finely tuned balance (termed homeostasis) and how alterations in these fundamental mechanisms lead to numerous diseases (e.g., heart disease, cancer, and diabetes). Physiologists integrate information from studies of our genes, the development of cells and tissues and their structure and function, the co-ordinated communication between cells and tissues, and the processes by which our bodies metabolise and respond to our environment. Necessarily, research in Physiology is broad – from molecules to man, encompassing techniques as diverse as functional genetic screens in simple organisms (worms, flies); to transgenic approaches in rodents; to the clinical testing of drugs and gene therapy in humans. There has never been a better time to consider a focus in physiology – the conductor of the biomedical sciences orchestra.

     

What will I study?

Study in first year of the BSc will provide a broad foundation in biology, chemistry and maths. These courses establish skills and knowledge that underpin later study. In second year, students who are interested in majoring in Biomedical Science will begin to focus their course selection. First semester courses build on first year in areas of cell biology, cell and tissue physiology, biochemistry and molecular biology, all of which are fundamental building blocks for further study in the biomedical sciences. By the end of first semester of second year, you will make decisions about the areas you intend to follow within biomedical science and these decisions will influence course selection in second semester and later on in third year.

Students may select courses from one of the following areas in the Biomedical Science major. Please note that this is a guide only and that these study areas will not apear on your graduation certificate. Students will graduate with a Bachelor of Science majoring in Biomedical Science:
  • Anatomy

    In third year courses, students can expect to study the human body using prosected and plastinated material to gain insights into the complexity and interrelationships of tissues and organs. Traditional and advanced imaging methodologies will be used to explore normal and abnormal structure in a range of animal models currently used in biomedical science research. A comparative anatomical perspective will be used to demonstrate concepts that apply across different vertebrate groups.

    Assessment tasks are likely to include participation in oral presentations to the student cohort, production of laboratory reports and reviews of relevant literature.

    As well as content knowledge in this area you will be given the opportunity to develop a range of other skills such as dissection, materials testing, tissue preparation and the use of imaging technologies that will equip you to pursue a career in this area.

  • Developmental Biology

    The field of developmental biology draws on technical and analytical skills from all major branches of biology and the molecular and biomedical sciences. Consequently developmental biologists become highly competent experimental and theoretical scientists. There is enormous public interest in developmental biology due to the recent advances in stem cell biology and the promise of therapeutic advances in many of the major diseases afflicting the ageing population.

  • Human Genetics

    The compulsory and prerequisite courses in this area are intended to provide a grounding in the fundamentals of genetics.  The second and third years of this specialisation offer choices that allow each student to pursue their interests in fields related to genetics. These choices are important, since they can help you prepare for your chosen career path.

    The best approach is to decide what field you would like to learn more about, and then choose advanced courses in that field.  For example, if you choose Human Genetics, but are also interested in Neuroscience, you could plan to take NEUR3001 Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience and NEUR3002 Systems Neuroscience as electives in your third year. Both of these courses have BIOM2011 Integrative Cell and Tissue Biology as a prerequisite, and BIOM2012 Systems Physiology is a recommended prerequisite for NEUR3002.  You would therefore want to plan on BIOM2011 and probably BIOM2012 as electives in your second year.

    Alternatively, if you choose Human Genetics, and have a secondary interest in Behavioural Biology, you would want to take BIOL3207 Animal Behaviour in your third year.  This course requires BIOL2204 Zoology, and BIOL2204, in turn, has BIOL1030 Biodiversity and our Environment as a first-year prerequisite.  Therefore, you would want to take BIOL1030 as a first-year elective.

  • Immunology and Infectious Diseases

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) currently views infectious disease as the major ongoing threat to global health. Courses offered within the immunology and infectious disease stream cover these topics in a multidisciplinary approach. In the second year, students will study broad areas of microbiology including the different classes of infectious agents, the cell and molecular structures of pathogenic microorganisms, the basic biology of disease transmission, and immunological responses, These skills form the foundation of continued study in the broad areas of immunology, bacteriology, virology and parasitology.

    Third year courses include specialised studies on Advanced Immunology, including the molecular basis of immune recognition, vaccine development and immune diseases; Virology; Microbes and Human Health, including public health epidemiology; Molecular Microbiology and a choice of other related courses such as Molecular Cell Biology  and Human Molecular Genetics and Disease.

    Students enrolled in courses comprising the immunology and infectious disease stream will be exposed to a combination of lectures, practicals and problem-based learning exercises (PBLs). Assessment tasks will include practical write-ups, poster presentations, written assignments, oral presentations and examination.  As well as content knowledge in this area you will be given the opportunity to develop a range of other skills such as practical experience with diagnostic and research techniques, and skills in appropriate information technologies and scientific communication that will equip you to pursue a career in this area.

  • Neuroscience

    In third year students can expect to study the cell and molecular basis of neural communication in NEUR3001 Cell and Molecular Neuroscience. These foundation concepts in neural communication will be expanded upon to cover the function of connected groups of neurons that make the neural circuitry of the brain in NEUR3002 The Integrated Brain.  NEUR3002 will also cover an understanding of integrated brain function in both health and in disease.

    These two core neuroscience courses can effectively be complemented with the mechanisms of neural development and neural repair in DEVB3001 Developmental Neurobiology, and with ANAT3022 Functional Neuroanatomy. Functional neuroanatomy will also cover non invasive neural imaging techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, as tool for brain function and disease diagnosis.

    Students can effectively combine the area of neuroscience with other areas offered in this major such as pharmacology, anatomy, developmental biology, and human genetics.  This would equip students to peruse careers in mental health, health sciences, pharmaceutical firms, and in postgraduate neuroscience research.

  • Pharmacology

    The pharmacology stream is designed to take students from the molecular understanding of drugs and their properties to the integrated effects of drugs on major physiological systems. Students will learn how drugs affect the body and how the body affects drugs. In addition, students will learn basic and advanced experimental approaches and research skills that will enable them to investigate drug actions and effects.

    The stream of pharmacology is a highly integrated program that commences in the second semester of year 2 and continues into more advanced studies in year 3. Initially, students will learn the basic molecular and cellular mechanisms of drug actions. Along with this fundamental knowledge, students will be shown essential skills for practical pharmacology experimentation. This is followed in year 3 by a systems approach to pharmacology where the effects of drugs on integrated physiological processes is studied.  By the second semester of year 3, students will be taught the current state-of-the-art pharmacology research undertaken at The University of Queensland. A hands-on approach under the guidance of senior researchers will enable students to learn the most current research in pharmacology and to participate in practical methodology to ensure they graduate with excellent scientific research skills.

    Students will be assessed by a variety of methods.  In the earlier years where basic knowledge is paramount, formal examination will cover an assessment of practical skills within the laboratory and specific knowledge in the form of short essays. Critically thinking will be assessed by inter-semester assignments that cover the pharmacology of specific drugs. In the latter courses, students will be expected to demonstrate more advanced laboratory skills and will participate in formal journal clubs and subject-specific debates. End of semester exams require both depth and breadth of knowledge to be demonstrated in the form of substantive essay writing.

  • Physiology

    In semester 2 of second year, the physiology stream commences with BIOM2012 Systems Physiology, an overview of the normal function of major tissues and organs in the body; how they integrate to maintain homeostasis and how their dysfunction causes disease. Students will appreciate that themes developed in the prerequisite subjects, such as cell:cell communication and gas/nutrient/waste exchange, are repeated from tissue to tissue to subserve different functions. Cell responsiveness to hormonal and nervous stimuli will be highlighted as a basis for understanding how integration of various functions occurs across the body. Experimentally, students will obtain competency in experimental design, investigational approaches, data acquisition/analysis and research communication relating to human and animal physiology.

    The platform provided by BIOM2012 is followed by third year courses in BIOM3014 Molecular and Cellular Physiology and BIOM3015 Integrative Physiology and Pathophysiology, where students will obtain in-depth knowledge and practical experience of the molecular processes and signalling pathways that maintain cell integrity, communication and function as they relate to tissue function and homeostatic integration. Students will examine the molecular, cellular and physiological changes that occur with age and disease and the molecular basis of therapeutic approaches. This information will be acquired in the setting of these core courses in the biomedical sciences, along with alternative opportunities in genetics and molecular biology, and the recommended affiliated areas of endocrinology, pharmacology, development, immunology and neuroscience. 

    Demonstrated understanding of key molecular, cellular and physiological concepts in health and disease will be assessed by end of semester exams (MCQs, short answer questions and essays) and supported by assignments and practical reports to provide ongoing development of presentation, writing, and analytical skills as well as competency in observational and experimental approaches to physiological research.

 

 

Study Plans

Biomedical Science is available as a Single Major or an Extended Major. To complete the Single Major, you are required to complete #14 (#6 at Level 2 and #8 at Level 3) from the Biomedical Science course list. To complete an Extended Major, you are required to complete #22 (#10 at level 2 and #12 at Level 3) from the Biomedical Science course list. Students may select courses from one of the following areas in the Biomedical Science major. Please note that this is a guide only and that these study areas will not apear on your graduation certificate. Students will graduate with a Bachelor of Science majoring in Biomedical Science.
 
Please refer to the course list below to ensure you complete the major requirements.

How do I use the Study Plans?

  1. Choose a study plan.
  2. Take all Compulsory Courses in each semester.
  3. Select required number of units in Key Courses for each year level. 
  4. Ensure you take at least #12 of level 3 (or 4) courses from the BSc course list.
  5. Fill gaps in semesters with Key or Recommended Courses or electives from BSc or other programs.
    (Standard full-time semester load #8.)
  6. Ensure you meet the BSc requirements and rules.

What do the different columns mean?

  • Compulsory courses – compulsory for the major.
  • Key courses – electives from the major's course list.
  • Recommended courses – complements the major. 

Biomedical Science (Single Major) - Anatomy Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least #4 from:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
BIOM2020 Human Anatomy1
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
Plus #2 from the BSc course list
Sem 2  –
BIOM2012 Systems Physiology
BIOM2208 Differentiation & Development
BIOL2202 Genetics
Any course from the BiomedSc course list
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least #6 from:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
BIOM3002 Human Biomedical Anatomy Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
BIOM3003 Funct Musculoskeletal Anatomy
ANAT3022 Functional Neuroanatomy (Psyc)
BIOM3015 Physiology & Pathophysiology
NEUR3002 The Integrated Brain
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 

 1. BIOM2020 is a pre-requisite for BIOM3002 & BIOM3003

Biomedical Science (Extended Major) - Anatomy Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least #2 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2020 Human Anatomy
 
Sem 2
BIOL2202 Genetics
 

BIOM2012 Systems Physiology
BIOM2208 Differentiation & Development
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 

Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #101 from the following:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1   BIOM3002 Human Biomedical Anatomy
#2 from the
BiomedSc 3rd year course list
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
ANAT3022 Functional Neuroanatomy (Psyc)
BIOM3015 Physiology & Pathophysiology
NEUR3002 The Integrated Brain
BIOM3003 Funct Musculoskeletal Anatomy

Any course from the BiomedSc course list 

 1. May include SCIE3220, SCIE3221, SCIE3260, OR SCIE3261

Biomedical Science (Single Major) - Developmental Biology Area 

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #4 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
 –
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
Plus #2 from the BSc course list
Sem 2
 
BIOL2202 Genetics
BIOM2208 Differentiation & Development    

BIOM2012 Systems Physiology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list

Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least #6 from:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 

DEVB3002 Molec Mechanisms of Devel

One of:
BIOL3004 Genomics & Bioinformatics
BIOL3006 Molecular Cell Biology
BIOM3002 Human Biomedical Anatomy
BIOM3014 Molecular & Cell Physiology

Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
 
DEVB3001 Developmental Neurobiology

Any course from the BiomedSc course list 

 

 

Biomedical Science (Extended Major) - Developmental Biology Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #2 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
 –
Plus #2 from the BSc course list
Sem 2
BIOL2202 Genetics
BIOM2208 Differentiation & Development
BIOM2012 Systems Physiology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #101 from the following
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
DEVB3002 Molec Mechanisms of Devel
 
Choose #6 from:
BIOL3004 Genomics & Bioinformatics
BIOL3006 Molecular Cell Biology
BIOM3002 Human Biomedical Anatomy
BIOM3014 Molecular & Cell Physiology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
DEVB3001 Developmental Neurobiology

Any course from the BiomedSc course list

1. May include SCIE3220, SCIE3221, SCIE3260, OR SCIE3261
 

Biomedical Science (Single Major) - Human Genetics Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #4 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
Plus #2 from the BSc course list
Sem 2
 
BIOL2202 Genetics
BIOM2208 Differentiation & Development
MICR2000 Microbiology & Immunology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least #6 from:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
BIOL3004 Genomics & Bioinformatics
BIOL3006 Molecular Cell Biology
DEVB3002 Molec Mechanisms of Devel
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
BIOC3003 Human Molec Genetics & Disease
BIOC3005 Molecular Systems Biology
DEVB3001 Developmental Neurobiology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 

 

Biomedical Science (Extended Major) - Human Genetics Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least #2 from:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
 
Plus #2 from the BSc course list
Sem 2
BIOL2202 Genetics
BIOM2208 Differentiation & Development
MICR2000 Microbiology & Immunology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #101 from the following
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
BIOL3004 Genomics & Bioinformatics
DEVB3002 Molec Mechanisms of Devel
BIOL3006 Molecular Cell Biology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
BIOC3003 Human Molec Genetics & Disease
BIOC3005 Molecular Systems Biology
DEVB3001 Developmental Neurobiology

Any course from the BiomedSc course list

 

1. May include SCIE3220, SCIE3221, SCIE3260, OR SCIE3261
 

Biomedical Science (Single Major) - Immunology and Infectious Diseases Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #4 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
Plus #2 from the BSc course list
Sem 2
 
MICR2000 Microbiology & Immunology
BIOL2202 Genetics
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least #6 from:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
BIOL3003 Advanced Immunology
MICR3002 Virology
MICR3003 Molecular Microbiology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
MICR3001 Microbes & Human Health
Any course from the BiomedSc course list

 

Biomedical Science (Extended Major) - Immunology and Infectious Diseases Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #2 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
 –
Plus #2 from the BSc course list
Sem 2
BIOL2202 Genetics
MICR2000 Microbiology & Immunology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #101 from the following
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
BIOL3003 Advanced Immunology
MICR3002 Virology
MICR3003 Molecular Microbiology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science

MICR3001 Microbes & Human Health
#2 from the BiomedSc 3rd year course list

Any course from the BiomedSc course list

1. May include SCIE3220, SCIE3221, SCIE3260, OR SCIE3261 
 

Biomedical Science (Single Major) - Neuroscience Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #4 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
Plus #2 from the BSc course list
Sem 2
 
BIOM2012 Systems Physiology
BIOL2202 Genetics
BIOM2208 Differentiation & Development
BIOM2402 Principles of Pharmacology
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least #6 from:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
NEUR3001 Molecular & Cell Neuroscience
BIOM3401 Systems Pharmacology
DEVB3002 Molec Mechanisms of Devel
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
NEUR3002 The Integrated Brain
ANAT3022 Functional Neuroanatomy (Psyc)
DEVB3001 Developmental Neurobiology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 

 

Biomedical Science (Extended Major) - Neuroscience Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses

Key Courses
Choose #2 for:

Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
 –

Any course from the BiomedSc course list
Plus #2 from the BSc course list

Sem 2
BIOL2202 Genetics
BIOM2012 Systems Physiology
BIOM2208 Differentiation & Development
BIOM2402 Principles of Pharmacology
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #101 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
BIOM3401 Systems Pharmacology
NEUR3001 Molecular & Cell Neuroscience
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
NEUR3002 The Integrated Brain
ANAT3022 Functional Neuroanatomy (Psyc)
DEVB3001 Developmental Neurobiology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list
1. May include SCIE3220, SCIE3221, SCIE3260, OR SCIE3261.
 

Biomedical Science (Single Major) - Pharmacology Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #4 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology 
Sem 2
 
BIOM2402 Principles of Pharmacology
BIOL2202 Genetics
BIOM2012 Systems Physiology
CHEM2002 Physical Chemistry
CHEM2052 Chemical Biology
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least #10 from:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
BIOM3401 Systems Pharmacology
BIOM3020 Integrated Endocrinology
BIOM3014 Molecular & Cell Physiology
BIOT3002 Drug Design & Development
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
BIOM3402 Advanced Pharmacology
BIOM3015 Physiology & Pathophysiology
NEUR3002 The Integrated Brain
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 

 

Biomedical Science (Extended Major) - Pharmacology Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least  #2 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
 –  –
Sem 2
BIOL2202 Genetics
BIOM2402 Principles of Pharmacology
CHEM2002 Physical Chemistry
CHEM2052 Chemical Biology
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #101 from the following
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
BIOM3401 Systems Pharmacology
BIOM3020 Integrated Endocrinology
BIOM3014 Molecular & Cell Physiology
BIOT3002 Drug Design & Development
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
BIOM3402 Advanced Pharmacology
BIOM3015 Physiology & Pathophysiology
NEUR3002 The Integrated Brain

Any course from the BiomedSc course list

1. May include SCIE3220, SCIE3221, SCIE3260, OR SCIE3261
 

Biomedical Science (Single Major) - Physiology Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #4 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
Plus #2 from the BSc course list
Sem 2
 
BIOM2012 Systems Physiology
BIOL2202 Genetics
BIOM2402 Principles of Pharmacology
MICR2000 Microbiology & Immunology
BIOM2208 Differentiation & Development
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose at least #6 from:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
BIOM3014 Molecular & Cell Physiology
BIOM3020 Integrated Endocrinology
NEUR3001 Molecular & Cell Neuroscience
BIOM3401 Systems Pharmacology
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
BIOM3015 Physiology & Pathophysiology
NEUR3002 The Integrated Brain
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
 
 

Biomedical Science (Extended Major) - Physiology Area

You can find details about the first year of the program here.

Year 2 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #2 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
BIOC2000 Biochem & Molecular Biology
BIOL2200 Cell Structure & Function
BIOM2011 Cell & Tissue Biology
 –

Any course from the BiomedSc course list
Plus #2 from the BSc course list 

Sem 2
BIOL2202 Genetics
BIOM2012 Systems Physiology
BIOM2402 Principles of Pharmacology
BIOM2208 Differentiation & Development
MICR2000 Microbiology & Immunology
Year 3 Compulsory Courses
Complete all courses
Key Courses
Choose #101 for:
Recommended Courses
 
Sem 1
 
BIOM3014 Molecular & Cell Physiology
BIOM3020 Integrated Endocrinology
NEUR3001 Molecular & Cell Neuroscience
Any course from the BiomedSc course list 
Sem 2
BIOM3200 Biomedical Science
BIOM3015 Physiology & Pathophysiology
NEUR3002 The Integrated Brain

Any course from the BiomedSc course list

1. May include SCIE3220, SCIE3221, SCIE3260, OR SCIE3261
 
 

Major Convenor & Physiology Area Convenor

Dr Mark Bellingham 

 Specific Research Area – Molecular, cellular and systems neurophysiology
 
What I do
 
I am interested in the way that the brain controls movement, growth and metabolism. My current projects focus mainly on the molecular, cellular and systems neurophysiology of motor neurons in health and disease. Many ion channels, synaptic inputs and signalling cascades in motor neurons orchestrate firing and muscle activity in response to a wide variety of demands from central neural motor control circuits. My research, which is largely based on transgenic animal models, is relevent to human conditions such as motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), obstructive sleep apnoea, Rett syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.
 
What I teach
 
I teach physiology and neuroscience to science, veterinary science and medical students. My main interest is in neurophysiology.

Choose an area below to view the convenor:

Anatomy Area Convenor

Professor Mike Bennett

Specific Research Areas – Functional and Comparative Anatomy
 
What I do
 
As an anatomist with a background in zoology, my main research focus is on the structure and mechanical properties of biological materials in relation to their roles in living organisms. Animal locomotion, whether on the ground, in the air or in the water is a major area of interest, as it is a fundamental trait of animals and its study involves a wide range of concepts, knowledge and techniques in human and comparative anatomy, biomechanics and scaling. I am also part of a strong research group that studies the biology of sharks and rays – from taxonomy to ecology. These studies require an integrated approach that combines comparative anatomy, biomechanics, ecology, molecular genetics, physiology, pharmacology and zoology to address pure and applied questions about these interesting animals.
 
What I teach
 
I teach functional human anatomy and biomechanics to students in Science, Human Movement Studies and Physiotherapy. Comparative and functional anatomy of fishes is taught to students in Science and Marine Studies – which provides a link between one of my major areas of research (shark and ray biology) and the undergraduate teaching programme.
 

Developmental Biology Area Convenor

Professor Brian Key

Specific Research Area – Developmental Biology, Regenerative Biology, Neurobiology
  
What I do
 
My laboratory has set itself the task of understanding the secrets underlying the development of the brain. How does the vertebrate brain – the most complex tissue in the universe – develop from a simple sheet of cells into an organ? How does it have the ability to synthesise complex thoughts and processes? Our ability to manipulate and control these molecular and cellular processes will contribute to therapeutic approaches in health and disease of the brain.
 
What I teach
 
I teach students the principles of developmental biology at all levels of their career. In first year I instruct students of BIOL1040 Cells to Organisms in the marvels of stem cell biology. During the second year course BIOM2208 Differentiation and Development I introduce students to how embryos build intricate tissues and organs. I lead third year students through the mechanisms of axon growth and regeneration in DEVB3001 Developmental Neurobiology.
 

Human Genetics Area Convenor

Dr Ethan Scott

Specific Research Area - Genetics and Neuroscience
 

What I do
 
The fine workings of the functioning brain, and the mechanisms by which the brain generates behaviour, are what fascinate me as a neuroscientist and geneticist. Using transgenic technologies in the zebrafish model system, members of my lab first describe brain circuits anatomically, in terms of their cellular structures and connectivity. We then silence the circuits, and study the affected animals in a range of behavioural tests. Our goal is to learn what cell types and neural circuits drive the complex behaviours that we perform every day.
 
What I teach
 
I lecture in a range of topics, including Cell Biology, Developmental Neuroscience, and experimental Genetics techniques.
 

Immunology and Infectious Diseases Area Convenor

Associate Professor Stuart Kellie

Specific Research Area – Macrophage biology and intracellular signalling
 
What I do
 
As an immunologist and cell biologist, I have a specific interest in the identification of novel genes associated with inflammatory diseases and genes that are aberrantly expressed in these diseases. My ongoing research involves the elucidation of the function of the gene products with an overall aim of identifying new targets for drug discovery. I also have a strong interest in intracellular signalling and am currently investigating the role of several intracellular signalling molecules in inflammation and breast cancer. 
 
What I teach
 
In addition to teaching Immunology to second and third year students, I also teach cell biology to second year students and immunology in the medical and nursing programs.
 

Neuroscience Area Convenor

Associate Professor Peter G. Noakes

Specific Research Area – The cell and molecular basis of neural connections within the developing neuro-motor system.
 
What I do
 
As a cell and molecular neuroscientist, my main interest is in working out how trans-synaptic signalling molecules work to build and maintain a functioning neuro-motor system. I am also interested in how some molecules of the immune system participate in this process during normal development, and during the loss of neural connections in neural degenerative diseases such as motor neuron disease.
 
What I teach
 
I lecture second and third year students in neuro-motor control of movement, cell and molecular neuroscience, and in the mechanisms that drive the development of muscle. I have also developed advanced cell and molecular neuroscience practicals. These subjects are core to my research activities, and they therefore help me to continually deliver the most up-to-date developments in these fields.
 

Pharmacology Area Convenor

Professor Rod Minchin

Major research Area – Molecular pharmacology
 
What I do
 
As a molecular pharmacologist, I have a strong interest in cancer causes and treatment, pharmacogenetics, gene therapy and the application of nanotechnology to drug design and development. My research endeavours to find new solutions to understanding how and why cancer develops and whether this knowledge can be used to develop novel approaches to detection and treatment of the disease.
 
What I teach
 
I teach to science and medicine students on a diverse scope of pharmacology including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug metabolism, gene therapy and pharmacogenetics.

 

Careers

Employment prospects for graduates majoring in Biomedical Science are excellent in research environments, government, education and industry.

Biomedical science careers include: 
  • technical and scientific positions on research projects funded by government and private agencies
  • academic and research pathways in universities
  • research institutes and hospitals
  • government and industry
  • biotechnology companies developing and marketing reagents and kits for medical diagnosis
  • laboratory work in molecular and cellular biology
  • work in scientific sales and marketing
  • when combined with a  teaching qualification, students can teach in secondary schools or other educational institutions.
 
A major in Biomedical Science may also be used to gain skills and knowledge required for graduate entry to programs such as Bachelor of Medicine/Surgery (MBBS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).