Material Geographies of Household Sustainability

Material Geographies of Household Sustainability Project

4 - 5 September 2009
Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology

 

Material geographies of household sustainability in Australia and the UK will bring together interdisciplinary researchers working on household responses to environmental pressures associated with climate change, to exchange new research in this critical field. The emphasis will be on material culture, in the form of the physical spaces of houses/gardens, the infrastructure and services used to maintain them, and the material goods that flow through them. The format will be a 1.5 day workshop discussion of pre-written papers on the latest research with the objective of developing national and international collaborations, and garnering a journal issue (or edited collection) output.

The symposium also seeks to advance international dialogue and collaboration in this kind of research: changing everyday domestic practices and improving household sustainability requires coordinated effort across the globe. To this end, this symposium seeks to foster comparative discussions across Australian and British perspectives, with invited participants from the UK. This collaboration seeks to promote ongoing international work between participants, and thus speaks directly to the CRN’s aim to foster national and international research linkages. An early outcome will be the compilation of the papers into a special journal issue or edited collection.

Enquiries to Andrew Gorman-Murray

report

The symposium, Material geographies of household sustainability, was held at RMIT University on 4-5 September 2009. It was sponsored by the CRN and hosted by the Centre for Design at RMIT. The symposium brought together interdisciplinary researchers working on household responses to environmental pressures associated with climate change, to exchange new research in this critical field. There was an emphasis on material culture, in the form of the physical spaces of houses/gardens, the infrastructure and services used to maintain them, and the material goods that flow through them. Regional case studies were drawn from Australia, South East Asia, the UK and the US to allow cross-cultural comparison. Plans are underway for the publication of an edited collection of papers from the event.