What story do your photographs tell?

These photos show the horrific condition of Afghan Children refugees in Iran who have no ID Card.

Some of them suffer from hunger, their eyes so sad even when they were laughing. They were old before they could experience youth.

Why is this project important?

Iran has a rule that citizenship is determined by the nationality of the father.

This causes great hardship and disempowerment. I tried through my photography to address this issue focusing on Afghan refugees.

I was deeply concerned about the impact of this law of citizenship on the Afghan refugees, in particular the children.

I saw many children with Iranian mothers whom the government did not recognize as Iranian citizens and therefore did not give Iranian ID cards that grant rights of citizenship. Most of these children live outside refugee camps.

They have to work to survive because they do not have ID cards and therefore are not eligible for free education and cannot work legally in Iran.

As a result they are stuck in a vicious cycle of poverty. Even if they are harmed or killed, no one can object because they are not viewed as citizens.

What positive consequences might result from these photographs?

It is our responsibility to look, understand and think about them and it will help me to organize a campaign to change Iran citizenship laws to change these children living condition in Iran.

What background and preparation do you have in this field?

I obtained my B.A in Photography from Azad University, Tehran and two M.As in Photography and Art Studies from the University of Art, Tehran and at the moment I am working on my thesis for gaining a M.A degree in Communication for Development from Malmo University.

I started my career as a documentary photographer and I consider myself a documentary protestor.

My life pursuit is to use my ability as a photographer and an academic to raise awareness among people about critical societal issues and to infuse them with a passion for change.

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