Professor Doune Macdonald
Professor Doune Macdonald

BHMS, BHMS(Ed)(Hons), PhD

Phone: +61 (7) 336 51075
Office: Room 313, Level 3, Learning Innovation Building (St Lucia)
Post: The University of Queensland Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia

Executive assistant
Phone: +61 (7) 336 51075
Email: pvctl@uq.edu.au

Areas of responsibility
As Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching & Learning), Professor Macdonald is responsible for achieving the University’s teaching and learning objectives, including innovation in teaching and learning, digital learning, development and recognition of excellent teaching, quality assurance and enhancement, curriculum reform and renewal, and research in teaching and learning that centres on improving student learning outcomes.

Biography
Professor Macdonald has had a career in education in schools and universities having completed her undergraduate degree in Human Movement Studies at The University of Queensland and obtained her PhD through Deakin University in 1992 after joining UQ as a Lecturer in 1990. She has won UQ and Australian Awards for University Teaching and a UQ Vice Chancellor’s Leadership Award. Since her appointment to UQ she has published nine books and over 150 book chapters and research papers.

Professor Macdonald served as Head of School of Human Movement Studies from 2004 to 2013. As an international leader in health and physical education she was appointed in 2011 by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority as their national Lead Writer for the field.

She is an International Fellow of the National Academy of Kinesiology, USA, a Fellow and Board Member of the Association Internationale des Ecoles Superieures d'Education Physique (AIESEP), a graduate member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors (GAICD) and serves on the board of the Brisbane Grammar School. Professor Macdonald has extensive international research partnerships, including having undertaken education missions with UNESCO, and she currently leads two ARC Discovery projects addressing global trends at the interface of health and education policies.

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